Spillover Effects of Environmental Regulation for Sea Turtle Protection: The Case of the Hawaii Shallow-set Longline Fishery

Abstract

This study examines spillover effects resulting from U.S. fishing regulations instituted to protect sea turtles. The co-existence of swordfish and sea turtles in the high seas of the North Pacific and that allows for "spillover effects": when one fishery is required to curtail fishing activity to reduce incidental fishing mortality on the sea turtle populations, the activity of other, unregulated fleets may change in ways that ultimately may adversely affect the very species intended for protection. This study provides an empirical model that estimates these spillover effects on sea turtle bycatch from production displacement between U.S. and non-U.S. fleets in the North Pacific Ocean. The study demonstrates strong spillover effects, resulting in more sea turtle interactions due to foreign fleet activity when Hawaii swordfish production declines.

Reports

Chan HL, Pan M
2012. Spillover Effects of Environmental Regulation for Sea Turtle Protection: The Case of the Hawaii Shallow-set Longline Fishery. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOAA-TM-NMFS-PIFSC-30, 38 p. + Appendices.

Presentations

Chan HL
2013. Spillover Effects of Marine Environmental Regulation for Sea Turtle Protection in the Hawaii Longline Swordfish Fishery. 2013 North American Association of Fisheries Economists Forum. St Petersburg, FL, May 22.
Pan M
2013. The connection between Sea Turtle Conservation and Food Security. 2013 Hawaii Conservation Conference, Honolulu, HI. July 17.