External Program Review of Economics and Human Dimensions

July 13, 2017 (updated 11/30/2017)

Review Information

The Review is open to the public. To view and listen to the Review online via WebEx web conferencing services, internet access and a phone line is required. Supporting materials, agenda and speaker bios will continue to be updated. Please check back.

Location:

Dates:

  • July 31 - August 2, 2017

To join meeting online:

To join by phone:

For Technical Assistance:

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Due to space limitations at Pier 38, we are asking PIFSC staff to view the proceedings at the NOAA Inouye Regional Center (IRC) via WebEx in Room 1377.

NOAA Fisheries constantly strives to improve the quality and timeliness of our science at each of the agency's six science centers and the headquarters Office of Science and Technology. A standardized six-year cycle of peer review and evaluation of our fundamental science programs at both the national and regional level help us to stay at the cutting edge of science and still meet the needs of our stakeholders. Each year of the cycle has a specific thematic focus. In 2017, the focus is on NOAA Fisheries' economics and human dimensions science programs.

The Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) provides data, information, analysis and technical advice to a wide assortment of clients and partners, including the Pacific Islands Regional Office (PIRO) and other offices of NOAA Fisheries, and the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council. Scientific information is produced and assembled by PIFSC and made available to other agencies of NOAA and the Federal government; state and territorial government agencies; university and other scientific research partners, both domestic and international; and the general public.

During the PIFSC's 2017 review, the independent panel, composed of outside experts, will learn about information needs, priorities, and research activities that are relevant to current economics and human dimensions research programs. The review panel will provide input on ways to improve the quality of these programs. The review will include background materials, presentations by scientists, extended discussion sessions, and opportunities for public comment. Independent review reports from the panelists and our response, including an action plan for program adjustments based on panelists' recommendations, will be available after the review.

The panel of experts will be:

The PIFSC Program Review will be open to the public and held at the NOAA offices on Pier 38, in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi.

Supporting Materials

PIFSC Background Policy and Planning Documents

  • National Marine Fisheries Service
    2016. Fisheries Priorities and Annual Guidance for 2017. Silver Spring, MD: National Marine Fisheries Service.
  • Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
    2016. PIFSC Priorities and Annual Planning Guidance for FY2017. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center FY17 Annual Guidance Memorandum Sept. 2016.
  • Pacific Islands Regional Office
    2015. Pacific Islands Regional Office Strategic Plan: 2016-2020. Honolulu, HI: NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office.
  • Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council
    2014. WPRFMC Five-year Research Priorities under the MSRA 2014-2019. Honolulu, HI: Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council.
  • Pooley S
    2013. PIFSC Science Plan (2013). Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Administrative Report H-13-01, 21p.
  • Link JS, Griffis R, Busch S (Editors)
    2015. NOAA Fisheries Climate Science Strategy. U.S. Dept. of Commerce, NOAA Technical Memorandum, NMFS-F/SPO-155, 70p.
  • Polovina J, Dreflak K, Baker J, Bloom S, Brook S, Chan V, Ellgen S, Golden D, Hospital J, Van Houtan K, Kolinski S, Lumsden B, Maison K, Mansker M, Oliver T, Spalding S, Woodworth-Jefcoats P
    2015. Pacific Islands Region Climate Science Strategy Regional Action Plan. Honolulu, HI: Jeffrey Polovina et al.

Supporting Materials for Economics and Human Dimensions Presentations

Introduction to Western Pacific Fisheries and Communities

  • Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council
    2016. Pacific Islands Fishery Monographs 5: Fishing Fleets and Fishery Profiles. Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, 40p.
  • Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council
    2016. Pacific Islands Fishery Monographs 7: Western Pacific Indigenous Fishing Communities. Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, 24p.

Noncommercial Fisheries

  • National Marine Fisheries Service
    2016. National Saltwater Recreational Fisheries Policy: Pacific Islands Regional Implementation Plan, 2016-2017.

Ecosystem Science

  • National Marine Fisheries Service
    2015. Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management Policy of the National Marine Fisheries Service. September 9, 2015 discussion draft.
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    2015. NOAA's Response to: Exploration of Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management in the United States. A report to the NOAA Science Advisory Board July 2014.
  • NOAA Ecosystem-Based Fishery Management Working Group
    2014. Exploration of Ecosystem Based Fishery Management in the United States. A Report from the NOAA Science Advisory Board.

Support for Management

  • Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council
    2009. Fishery Ecosystem Plan for the American Samoa Archipelago. Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, 220p.
  • Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council
    2009. Fishery Ecosystem Plan for the Hawaii Archipelago. Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, 228p.
  • Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council
    2009. Fishery Ecosystem Plan for the Mariana Archipelago. Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, 251p.
  • Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council
    2009. Fishery Ecosystem Plan for Pacific Pelagic Fisheries of the Western Pacific Region. Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, 251p.
  • Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council
    2009. Fishery Ecosystem Plan for the Pacific Remote Island Areas. Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, 251p.

PIFSC Response, Chair Summary, and Reviewer Reports

Subsequent to the public review, each panelist produces an independent report outlining their individual areas of concern and areas for improvement, along with their personal recommendations for Center actions to overcome these obstacles. The Chair's report synthesizes only those concerns and recommendations shared by the entire panel. The Center's response, and the action items and timelines within it, is framed around the synthesized comments but each report is thoroughly read and its input absorbed for Division strategic planning and improvement.

Agenda and Presentations

Presentations made by PIFSC staff for the review will be posted below as they become available. Click on a topic or "+/-" to toggle the display of related presentations, or click "++" or "––" to toggle display of all presentations below.

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Day 1 - Monday July 31, 2017 at NOAA offices on Pier 38
Time Topic
8:30 AM
Welcome, Business Rules, and Introductions — Michael Seki
8:40 AM
Instructions to Panel and Terms of Reference (TOR) — Michael Seki
8:50 AM
Overview of NMFS Program Reviews — Cisco Werner
9:00 AM
NMFS Economics and Human Dimensions Research — Rita Curtis
Presentation:
9:15 AM
Introduction to PIFSC Science Programs — Michael Seki
Presentation:
9:30 AM
PIFSC Economics and Human Dimensions Research — Justin Hospital
Presentation:
10:00 AM
Break
10:15 AM
Leadership Discussion Panel
10:45 AM
Public Q&A
  Theme I: Data Collection and Data Management
11:00 AM
Ongoing Economic Data Collection Programs — Minling Pan
Presentation:
11:20 AM
Cost-Earnings Data Collection Programs — Justin Hospital
Presentation:
11:40 AM
Data Access and Public Access to Research Results — Justin Hospital
Presentation:
12:00 PM
Public Q&A
12:30 PM
Lunch
  Theme II: Human Dimensions and Communities
1:30 PM
PIFSC Human Dimensions Research — Kirsten Leong
Presentation:
1:45 PM
Fishing Community Profiles — Adam Ayers
Presentation:
2:00 PM
Community Social Vulnerability Indicators — Danika Kleiber
Presentation:
2:15 PM
Break
2:30 PM
Western Pacific Socioeconomic Monitoring and Capacity Building — Supin Wongbusarakum
Presentation:
2:45 PM
Science of Compliance and Communications — Kirsten Leong
Presentation:
3:00 PM
Stakeholder and Scientist Discussion Panel
3:30 PM
Public Q&A
4:00 PM
Panel Review and Discussion (closed session)
5:00 PM Adjourn
Day 2 - Tuesday August 1, 2017 at NOAA offices on Pier 38
Time Topic
8:30 AM
Schedule for the Day (TOR Questions and Themes)
  Theme III: Commercial Fisheries Economics
8:45 AM
Overview of PIFSC Commercial Fishing Economics and Market Research — Justin Hospital
Presentation:
9:15 AM
Swordfish Time-Area Closure Analysis — Minling Pan
Presentation:
  • Pan M
    2017. Time and Area Closure Analysis - A Policy Simulation Model Under the Sea Turtle Caps. Presentation, PIFSC Economics and Human Dimensions Science Program Review. Honolulu, HI. August 1.
9:30 AM
Positive Mathematical Programming — Jonathan Sweeney
Presentation:
9:45 AM
Stakeholder and Scientist Discussion Panel
10:30 AM
Public Q&A
10:45 AM
Break
  Theme IV: Noncommercial Fisheries Economics
11:00 AM
Overview of PIFSC Noncommercial Fisheries Economics Research — Justin Hospital
Presentation:
11:30 AM
Cost-Earnings of Hawaiʻi Charter Fishery — Emily Rollins
Presentation:
11:45 AM
Stakeholder and Scientist Discussion Panel
12:15 PM
Public Q&A
12:30 PM
Lunch
  Theme V: Communicating Science and Outreach
1:30 PM
PIFSC Science Communications Strategy — Amanda Dillon
Presentation:
1:45 PM
Economics and Human Dimensions Communication and Outreach — Justin Hospital
Presentation:
2:00 PM
Economics and Human Dimensions Poster Session
3:00 PM
Public Q&A
3:30 PM
Panel Review and Discussion (closed session)
5:00 PM Adjourn
Day 3 - Wednesday August 2, 2017 at NOAA offices on Pier 38
Time Topic
8:30 AM
Schedule for the Day (TOR Questions and Themes)
  Theme VI: Ecosystem Science
8:45 AM
Overview of Ecosystem Science Division and Research — Frank Parrish
Presentation:
9:00 AM
Atlantis Ecosystem Model and Applications — Mariska Weijerman
Presentation:
  • Weijerman M
    2017. Ecosystem Models - Integrating Oceanographic, Ecological and Socio-Economic data. Presentation, PIFSC Economics and Human Dimensions Science Program Review. Honolulu, HI. August 2.
9:15 AM
West Hawaiʻi Integrated Ecosystem Assessment — Kirsten Leong
Presentation:
9:30 AM
Stakeholder and Scientist Discussion Panel
10:15 AM
Public Q&A
10:30 AM
Break
  Theme VII: Support for Management
10:45 AM
Management Advice and Stock Assessment/Fishery Evaluation (SAFE) Reports — Justin Hospital
Presentation:
  • Hospital J
    2017. Support for Management: Management Advice and Stock Assessment and Fishery Evaluation (SAFE) Reports. Presentation, PIFSC Economics and Human Dimensions Science Program Review. Honolulu, HI. August 2.
11:00 AM
Marine National Monument Science — Justin Hospital
Presentation:
11:15 AM
Spillover Effects of Swordfish Regulations — Hing Ling Chan
Presentation:
  • Chan HL, Pan M
    2017. Spillover Effects of Environmental Regulation for Sea Turtle Protection in the Hawaii Longline Swordfish Fishery. Presentation, PIFSC Economics and Human Dimensions Science Program Review. Honolulu, HI. August 2.
11:30 AM
Stakeholder and Scientist Discussion Panel
12:00 PM
Public Q&A
12:30 PM
Week in Review and Closing Remarks — Michael Seki
12:45 PM
Adjourn Public Portion of Review
2:00 PM
Panel Review and Discussion (closed session)
5:00 PM Adjourn
Day 4 - Thursday August 3, 2017 at NOAA Inouye Regional Center (closed session)
Time Topic
8:00 AM
Panel Review and Discussion (closed session at IRC)
4:00 PM
Final Panel Reports to PIFSC Directorate (closed session at IRC)
TBD Adjourn

Map of Location and Parking Area

 

NOAA offices on Pier 38 (at 1139 N. Nimitz Highway, suite #220, Honolulu, HI 96817). Parking area for program review attendees is highlighted in red on the map. Click here to reset map.

Speaker Bios

Adam Ayers

Adam earned a Ph.D. in Urban & Regional Planning from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in 2016. His dissertation focused on community-state collaboration to improve coral reef fisheries co-management across the main Hawaiian Islands. His research interests include the role of institutions and planning in marine social-ecological systems. Adam is currently involved in three projects: updating the fishing community profile for the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; analyzing the differential effects of spatial and regulatory closures on the Hawaiʻi longline fishery; and conducting oral history research and outreach for the Hawaiʻi Bottomfish Heritage project.

Hing Ling "Michel" Chan

Hing Ling earned a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in 2002. Her research interests include economic impact analysis, economics of small-boat fisheries in the Pacific, and quantitative fishery modeling for policy analysis. Hing Ling is currently involved in economic performance analysis for the small boat fisheries in Hawaiʻi and the territories, and fisheries economic indicators analysis.

Rita Curtis

Dr. Rita Curtis is the Chief of NOAA Fisheries Service Office of Science & Technology Economic & Social Analysis Division. She has worked for NOAA Fisheries Service since receiving her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in 1999. Prior to this, she worked at the Honolulu Lab conducting data collections and economic analyses of the Hawaii-based longline fleet.

Amanda Dillon

Amanda Dillon coordinates scientific communications, outreach, and graphic design at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center with the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research. Amanda contributes to development and strategy for PIFSC web content, educational materials, and social media. She has extensive experience in graphic design and program coordination, along with a dedication to communicating science clearly and effectively. Amanda started with the PIFSC Coral Reef Ecosystem Program in 2013. Before joining PIFSC, her professional experience included project management, grants administration, and event planning at the Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance, Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System, and Massachusetts Cultural Council. She has a B.A. from Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Justin Hospital

Justin joined PIFSC in 2006 and holds an M.S. degree in Agricultural and Applied Economics, with an emphasis in natural resource economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Since 2015, Justin has served as the program lead for the PIFSC Socioeconomics Program. Justin has engaged in seafood market analyses and survey-based research designed to describe the economic and social characteristics of small boat fisheries across the US-affiliated Western Pacific. His primary research interests include efforts to better understand fishery dynamics and drivers of fisher behavior.

Danika Kleiber

Danika earned a Ph.D. in Resource Management and Environmental Studies from the University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre in 2014. Bringing together a background in biology and women's studies her research interests include gender and small-scale fisheries. Danika manages the social indicators database for the Pacific Island region. She has also worked on characterizing the flow of pelagic fish through Hawaiʻi's seafood distribution network, and will soon begin to gather oral histories of fishing in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

Kirsten Leong

Kirsten received a Ph.D. in Natural Resource Management from Cornell University in 2007. She has worked as a Human Dimensions specialist in biological conservation of federal lands and waters for over 10 years, where her interests have focused on governance, public participation, and strategic communication. Her current research includes oral histories of artisanal fisheries, broadening ecosystem-based fisheries models to better represent social-ecological systems, and communicating risks about sources of seafood and interactions with protected species.

Minling Pan

Minling received a Ph.D. in Natural Resources and Agricultural Economics from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in 1998. She conducts fisheries economic research, implements and oversees economic data collection programs in support of fisheries management and monitoring the economic performance of commercial fisheries in the U.S. Pacific Islands areas. Her recent research interests focus on the trade-off evaluation of fisheries regulations related to protected species interactions with fisheries and the productivity and profitability analysis of commercial fisheries.

Frank Parrish

Frank Parrish is the Director of the Ecosystem Sciences Division, which is responsible for providing assessments of ecosystem status and other science products for oceanic and seafloor communities. As a research biologist, Frank's work is focused on habitat ecology using remote operated cameras, manned submersibles, and animal borne instrumentation. He serves on the agency's Advanced Sampling Technology Working Group to evaluate and promote new technology that improves marine survey capabilities. He has published findings on reef fish, deepwater snappers, sharks, lobster, and the endangered Hawaiian monk seal. His most recent work has focused on understanding the ecosystem processes of deep corals that grow on the moderate and deep slopes of the islands. Frank has lived in Hawaiʻi since high school and graduated B.A, M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Hawaiʻi.

Emily Rollins

Emily received her Master of Science in Food, Agriculture and Resource Economics from the University of Guelph, in Ontario, Canada. Her thesis-based research focused on agricultural trade between the US and Canada. Prior to joining the PIFSC program, her recent research focused on the bio-economic modeling and data collection relating to a project examining the historical impacts of impingement and entrainment on the present net benefits of a First Nations fishery on Lake Huron.

Michael Seki

In his role as Science and Research Director of the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Dr. Seki provides the science direction and oversight of research activities that support stewardship of living marine resources in the vast expanse of the Pacific Islands Region.

Since joining NOAA Fisheries in 1980, Dr. Seki has conducted extensive fisheries, oceanographic, and ecosystem research on many marine species in the Pacific region. He has authored or co-authored over 40 scientific papers and has participated on over 20 domestic and international research surveys, serving as the Chief Scientist on 14 of them. Prior to becoming Director, Dr. Seki served as Deputy Director for the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center; a position he had held since the Science Center was established in April 2003. In that position, he had the overarching responsibility and oversight of all Science Center operations. Dr. Seki is also the current team lead for NOAA Regional Collaboration efforts in the Pacific Islands Region.

Born and raised in Hawaiʻi, Dr. Seki received his B.S. in Biology from the University of Oregon (Eugene), his M.S. in Oceanography from the University of Hawaiʻi (Mānoa), and his Ph.D. in Marine Environment and Resources from Hokkaido University (Graduate School of Fisheries Science in Hakodate).

Jonathan Sweeney

Jonathan Sweeney has a B.A. in biology from Reed College and is pursuing a Ph.D. in economics at UH-Mānoa. His research focuses on applied microeconomics of fisheries, and finance. Currently, he works on policy evaluation for Hawaiʻi's longline fishery.

Mariska Weijerman

Mariska Weijerman has a M.Sc. in Tropical Ecology/Environmental Biology from the University of Amsterdam (1993), a M.Sc. in Tropical Coastal Management from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne (1994), and a Ph.D. in Ecosystem Modeling from the University of Wageningen (2015). She started her research career in microbiology, looking at the impacts of eutrophication on the plankton composition and harmful algal blooms in the Dutch lakes but quickly switched to the tropical rain forest in Guyana to look at the effects of logging on plant-animal interactions then moved on to the beaches of Surinam to work with three species of sea turtles. From 1997-2000, she worked on an integrated coastal fisheries development project (Desarrollo Integral de la Pesca Artisanal de Laguna de Perlas) for the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs in cooperation with the Nicaraguan Ministry of Fisheries and Economics. Back in the Netherlands, she looked at possible phase shifts in the North Sea based on a large set of environmental and biological long term data sets for the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research before moving to Hawaiʻi. In Hawaiʻi she first worked for the National Park Service as a marine and coastal ecologist and since 2009 as a coral ecology researcher for NOAA PIFSC. Current research includes ecosystem understanding through the use of ecosystem models and management strategy evaluation using the complex Atlantis ecosystem model.

Francisco "Cisco" Werner

Dr. Werner began serving as the Director of Scientific Programs and Chief Science Advisor at NOAA Fisheries in 2017. In this capacity, he leads NOAA Fisheries' efforts to provide the science needed to support sustainable fisheries and ecosystems and to continue our nation's progress in ending overfishing, rebuilding fish populations, saving critical species, and preserving vital habitats. As the head of NOAA Fisheries' scientific operations, Dr. Werner directs NOAA's six regional Fisheries Science Centers, including 30 laboratories. Dr. Werner previously served as the Science and Research Director for NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center from 2011 to 2016. Prior to joining NOAA Fisheries, Dr. Werner was the Director of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Studies at Rutgers University. His research has included the study of the structure and function of marine ecosystems, ocean circulation physics, and the development and implementation of ocean and coastal observing and forecasting systems. He has also researched the development of physical and biological models for marine ecosystems in the Northwest Atlantic, the U.S. South Atlantic Bight, and the North Pacific. Dr. Werner has co-authored more than 90 refereed publications and collaborated with many future colleagues at NOAA on important programs, including the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Program, Comparative Analysis of Marine Ecosystem Organization, Integrated Ocean Observing System, and various projects related to climate change and fisheries. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Washington.

Supin Wongbusarakum

Supin Wongbusarakum joined PIFSC in 2014 as a member of their senior management team and as Lead of the International Capacity Building team, which focuses on ecosystem-based fisheries management. She holds a Ph.D. in Human Geography from the University of Hawaiʻi and has more than 20 years of experience applying social scientific methodologies and developing practical tools to help improve natural resource management and conservation planning, and in particular tools for monitoring how the relationships among people, natural systems and management and conservation interventions affect human well-being. Supin has developed guidelines and trains staff and partners in the areas of socioeconomic monitoring, community-based climate vulnerability assessments, social resilience, and ecosystem approaches to fisheries management. She has supported many teams successfully conducting field research with coastal and island fishing communities in the Pacific.

Supin is also a research faculty with the University of Hawaiʻi Social Science Research Institute and a core team member of the working groups on evidence-based conservation and bio-cultural indicator development with the Science for Nature and People Partnership at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis of the University of California, Santa Barbara. Prior to joining NOAA, she was the first Senior Social Scientist at the Worldwide Office of The Nature Conservancy, Associate Director of the Hazards, Climate and Environment Program at the University of Hawaiʻi's Social Science Research Institute, and Project Leader of the East-West Center's Pacific Islands Regional Integrated Science and Assessment Program. She has lived and worked on several continents on projects related to conserving natural environments and local cultures, socioeconomic monitoring and training, equitable community development, coastal hazard mitigation, and climate adaptation.