Seafloor Mapping Data Used for Tsunami Modeling and Fisheries Research

High-resolution bathymetric data collected by the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center using multibeam sonar are being incorporated into topographic models used to support tsunami modeling and fisheries applications in American Samoa and other areas of the Pacific. The multibeam data, originally collected for coral reef ecosystem benthic habitat mapping by the Center's Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), have been made available online at the Pacific Islands Benthic Habitat Mapping Center (PIBHMC) and archived at the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC).

Scientists from CRED, Oregon State University, and Gaia Geo-Analytical (based in Corvallis, Oregon) provided other inputs for the topographic models, including integrated multibeam, LIDAR, and IKONOS imagery depth information for Tutuila Island in American Samoa. Integrated depth models are available for 11 additional islands from PIBHMC. Combining these data with other sources of information, tsunami modelers from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), Pacific Services Center, and NGDC have created continuous combined land and seafloor digital elevation models (DEMs) for Pago Pago (Tutuila Island), Midway Atoll (in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands), Wake Island, and Guam. These products are available online from NGDC.

Merged depth data from multibeam sonar IKONOS imagery provide seamless maps for numerous applications, 
             including fisheries studies and tsunami modeling.
Merged depth data from multibeam sonar IKONOS imagery provide seamless maps for numerous applications, including fisheries studies and tsunami modeling.