PIFSC Participates in Research to Advance Monitoring of Ocean Acidification

Carbonate chemistry data are collected almost continuously by a Moored Autonomous pCO<sub>2</sub> (MAPCO2) buoy 
                 along the forereef of Cayo Enrique in La Parguera, Puerto Rico.
Carbonate chemistry data are collected almost continuously by a Moored Autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) buoy along the forereef of Cayo Enrique in La Parguera, Puerto Rico.

To advance scientific knowledge of ocean acidification, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) established the Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test-bed in the La Parguera Marine Reserve on the south coast of Puerto Rico. Using the test-bed, researchers from NOAA, U.S. Geological Survey, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science of the University of Miami, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have collaborated in an ongoing investigation of diurnal and seasonal variability in water column pH, partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), and other parameters related to climate change issues, such as global warming and ocean acidification.

During 25 July to 5 August 2011, scientist Chip Young from the PIFSC Coral Reef Ecosystem Division visited La Parguera as part of an effort by CRED and the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) to achieve common understanding and consistency in methods for collecting marine water samples related to ocean acidification research and monitoring. Consistent sampling methodologies will help ensure the success of CRCP's upcoming implementation of its National Coral Reef Monitoring Plan (NCRMP), including measurements of water column temperature, DIC, and TA throughout the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.