Workshop Convened to Review Methods for Hawaii Marine Recreational Fishing Surveys

Figure 1. At South Point on the island of Hawaii, shoreline fishers can catch pelagic fish like these mahimahi using "trash bag" or "kite fishing" methods. Such isolated catches can be problematic when expanding sample data to derive landings estimates.  For example, application of expansion factors to a single shoreline-based marlin catch can lead to unrealistic estimates of marlin landings by Hawaii shoreline fishers.
Figure 1. At South Point on the island of Hawaii, shoreline fishers can catch pelagic fish like these mahimahi using "trash bag" or "kite fishing" methods. Such isolated catches can be problematic when expanding sample data to derive landings estimates. For example, application of expansion factors to a single shoreline-based marlin catch can lead to unrealistic estimates of marlin landings by Hawaii shoreline fishers.
Figure 2. Percentages of Hawaii boat-based fishing trips by pure recreational fishermen (catch never sold), expense recreational fishermen (catch sold to cover expenses), and commercial fishermen (catch sold for income) based on the CHTS phone surveys (2003-2010) and onsite surveys.
Figure 2. Percentages of Hawaii boat-based fishing trips by pure recreational fishermen (catch never sold), expense recreational fishermen (catch sold to cover expenses), and commercial fishermen (catch sold for income) based on the CHTS phone surveys (2003-2010) and onsite surveys.

Survey methods used in the Hawaii Marine Recreational Information Program (MRIP) project were reviewed at a workshop in Honolulu during July 16-19, 2012. The workshop covered methods currently applied in the Hawaii Marine Recreational Fishing Survey (HMRFS) and evaluated options for improving them. Attendees included MRIP statistical consultants and staff from the NMFS Office of Science and Technology, PIFSC, NMFS Pacific Islands Regional Office, HMRFS personnel and staff of the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council.

Workshop organizers guided MRIP statistical contractors on tours of several survey sites around the island of Oahu to familiarize them with shoreline site characteristics and survey conditions. The group also met with a HMRFS surveyor at work in Haleiwa to observe interviews and interactions with typical shoreline fishers.

Participants presented information on several topics:

The PIFSC Fisheries Monitoring Branch Chief reviewed how creel surveys are currently conducted in Guam, American Samoa, and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands by staff of the Western Pacific Fisheries Information Network. In these territorial surveys, both fish catch and fishing effort data are collected from onsite surveys rather than from telephone or mail surveys.